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Banana Bread French Toast
Another How Sweet It Is recipe, I just used a different banana bread than she did.
I love banana bread. Love it. It’s delicious and incredible. I also love french toast. A ton. Together? Awesome.
banana bread
1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
2 eggs
1/2 cup oil
3 1/2 bananas, very ripe, mashed
2 tablespoons creme fraiche or sour cream
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2/3 cup walnuts, toasted and chopped
Set oven to 350 degrees F. Line the bottom of a loaf pan with parchment paper.
Sift together the flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. Beat sugar and eggs with a whisk until light and fluffy, about 10 minutes. Drizzle in oil. Add mashed bananas, creme fraiche, and vanilla. Fold in dry ingredients and nuts. Pour into a lined loaf pan and bake for about 45 minutes to 1 hour.
french toast (about 6 slices of your bread)

3 large eggs
1/2 cup heavy cream (or half and half)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
butter for the pan
Slice banana bread to desired thickness. In a bowl, combine eggs, vanilla, cream and cinnamon, whisking until combined. Heat a griddle or large skillet over medium heat and brush with butter.  Dip each slice into the egg mixture for about 30 seconds to coat completely, then place on the buttered surface. Cook until golden and somewhat crispy, about 2 minutes per side. Serve with sliced bananas, and if you want, fresh whipped cream, syrup and a sprinkle of graham cracker crumbs. I’d have loved to do that, but I didn’t have the stuff for it and was too lazy to shower and go to the store. For a drizzly chocolate, combine 2 tablespoons chocolate chips and 1/4 teaspoon coconut oil in the microwave for about 45 seconds, mixing once during cooking time, until melty.

Banana Bread French Toast

Another How Sweet It Is recipe, I just used a different banana bread than she did.

I love banana bread. Love it. It’s delicious and incredible. I also love french toast. A ton. Together? Awesome.

banana bread

  • 1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup oil
  • 3 1/2 bananas, very ripe, mashed
  • 2 tablespoons creme fraiche or sour cream
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2/3 cup walnuts, toasted and chopped

Set oven to 350 degrees F. Line the bottom of a loaf pan with parchment paper.

Sift together the flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. Beat sugar and eggs with a whisk until light and fluffy, about 10 minutes. Drizzle in oil. Add mashed bananas, creme fraiche, and vanilla. Fold in dry ingredients and nuts. Pour into a lined loaf pan and bake for about 45 minutes to 1 hour.

french toast (about 6 slices of your bread)

  • 3 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream (or half and half)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • butter for the pan

Slice banana bread to desired thickness. In a bowl, combine eggs, vanilla, cream and cinnamon, whisking until combined. Heat a griddle or large skillet over medium heat and brush with butter.  Dip each slice into the egg mixture for about 30 seconds to coat completely, then place on the buttered surface. Cook until golden and somewhat crispy, about 2 minutes per side. Serve with sliced bananas, and if you want, fresh whipped cream, syrup and a sprinkle of graham cracker crumbs. I’d have loved to do that, but I didn’t have the stuff for it and was too lazy to shower and go to the store. For a drizzly chocolate, combine 2 tablespoons chocolate chips and 1/4 teaspoon coconut oil in the microwave for about 45 seconds, mixing once during cooking time, until melty.

Chicken Meatball Soup

How Sweet It Is is without a doubt my favorite food blog. I aspire  to that level of awesome. Anyway, I made this soup for lunch today, and it was delicious.

So dang good. 

I love Italian Wedding Soup, and this is very reminiscent of that.

Here we go.

serves 4-6

for meatballs

  • 1 pound ground chicken breast
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 cup romano cheese
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 cup panko bread crumbs

Combine all ingredients together in a large bowl and mix until just combined. Taking 1 tablespoon or so of the mixture, roll into meatballs of desired size.

for soup

  • 2 1/2 tablespoons of canola oil
  • 1 sweet onion, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced or pressed
  • 4 cups raw spinach
  • 32 ounces low-sodium chicken stock
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 can (14.5 ounces) diced tomatoes
  • 1/3 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
  • 1 1/2 cups small pasta (I used elbow macaroni)

Heat a large pot over medium heat and add 1 tablespoon canola oil. Add onion with a pinch of salt and stir to coat, then let cook until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add in spinach and garlic, stirring continuously until spinach wilts. Remove from the pot and set aside in a bowl.

With the heat still on medium, add remaining canola oil. Add in chicken meatballs and cook for 2-3 minutes, then flip and cook 2-3 minutes more. (If you make larger meatballs, you will have to cook a few minutes longer. Additionally I found it was easier to flip the meatballs with two small spoons since they are all crowded together in the pot.) Once meatballs are browned, add onion and spinach mixture back to the pot, then add in stock, water and tomatoes. Stir gently making sure meatballs have started to float. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer and let cook for 20 minutes. Add in pasta and parmesan cheese, then cook for 8-10 minutes more before serving. (Check your pasta frequently, because I only cooked mine for about 5 minutes at the end, actually)

After nearly 4 full days of fruits and vegetables only, I just spent about half an hour “hugging the throne,” if you will. 

Wow. I feel much, much better now, and this diet made me lose like 4 pounds (not that that was our reason for doing it), but somehow I don’t think this was worth it. Some websites that are trying to sell you something say this is normal, but I know medically that this is not healthy anymore.

I just made zucchini “pasta,” and it was legitimately delicious. So good I forgot to take a picture.
All you do is:
  Using a vegetable peeler, cut the zucchini into lengthwise ribbons. Peel off several from one side, then turn the zucchini and peel off more. Continue to turn and peel away ribbons until you get to the seeds at the core of the zucchini. (Throw out the core).
Now you can either boil the zucchini for 1 minute then blanche it (immediately run it under cold water), or you can put a little oil in a frying pan and just cook it for about 2-3 minutes. I did the latter, but I wish I’d done the former because it was just too oily for me. Because of that, I rinsed all the finished pasta with water and then patted it dry a bit to get rid of all the oil.
Then top it with a sauce of your choice. I did all natural pureed tomatoes, garlic, onions, red and orange peppers, and some herbs. 
This is actually really, really good!
(picture was from NYT, since I didn’t take one, like I said) 

I just made zucchini “pasta,” and it was legitimately delicious. So good I forgot to take a picture.

All you do is:

  Using a vegetable peeler, cut the zucchini into lengthwise ribbons. Peel off several from one side, then turn the zucchini and peel off more. Continue to turn and peel away ribbons until you get to the seeds at the core of the zucchini. (Throw out the core).

Now you can either boil the zucchini for 1 minute then blanche it (immediately run it under cold water), or you can put a little oil in a frying pan and just cook it for about 2-3 minutes. I did the latter, but I wish I’d done the former because it was just too oily for me. Because of that, I rinsed all the finished pasta with water and then patted it dry a bit to get rid of all the oil.

Then top it with a sauce of your choice. I did all natural pureed tomatoes, garlic, onions, red and orange peppers, and some herbs. 

This is actually really, really good!

(picture was from NYT, since I didn’t take one, like I said) 


Pasta Substitute!
I love pasta. Love it. Eat it several times a week. But it’s a no-go this week, so I had to find a replacement. 
Chickpeas! 
The sauce is just fresh diced tomatoes, olive oil, onions, spinach, a bit of cilantro, garlic, and red chili pepper. I heated it for a while so it would soften and not be chunky, cause I don’t really like chunks of tomato very much. 
Then I poured some sauce over chickpeas, and that’s it! Chickpeas are more dense and firm than pasta, but otherwise it’s not too ridiculously different. And it tastes great! 

Pasta Substitute!

I love pasta. Love it. Eat it several times a week. But it’s a no-go this week, so I had to find a replacement. 

Chickpeas! 

The sauce is just fresh diced tomatoes, olive oil, onions, spinach, a bit of cilantro, garlic, and red chili pepper. I heated it for a while so it would soften and not be chunky, cause I don’t really like chunks of tomato very much. 

Then I poured some sauce over chickpeas, and that’s it! Chickpeas are more dense and firm than pasta, but otherwise it’s not too ridiculously different. And it tastes great! 

I gave up on the green smoothie. Let’s be honest, it wasn’t good at all. I drank nearly half and starting gagging.
I’m in no way planning on posting every single thing I eat (I’m eating around 5 meals a day and have already skipped some less interesting ones) but I just wanted to make this post because it was my first time trying a Moro Orange.
So, so delicious. Moro oranges are a type of blood orange. They’re red and tart and so, so flavorful. 
P.S. When you eat an orange, eat the peel, too. It has a lot of vitamin C, helps prevent skin cancer, and more.
And I promise, it’s not bad tasting at all. I do it all the time now.

I gave up on the green smoothie. Let’s be honest, it wasn’t good at all. I drank nearly half and starting gagging.

I’m in no way planning on posting every single thing I eat (I’m eating around 5 meals a day and have already skipped some less interesting ones) but I just wanted to make this post because it was my first time trying a Moro Orange.

So, so delicious. Moro oranges are a type of blood orange. They’re red and tart and so, so flavorful. 

P.S. When you eat an orange, eat the peel, too. It has a lot of vitamin C, helps prevent skin cancer, and more.

And I promise, it’s not bad tasting at all. I do it all the time now.


First full day of fruit and vegetable eating.
The Green Smoothie.
Now, listen. I am a champion of smoothie-making. It really is something I nearly pride myself on. Planet Smoothie and Smoothie King have nothing on me—that’s legitimate. I make a mean fruit smoothie, and a big reason why is because I use all frozen fruit and no ice. Ice in smoothies just isn’t tasty. I don’t like that texture. My smoothies really are smooth, and they’re thicker and way more delicious that way. 
So anyway, smoothies have always been a big thing for me. 
But they’re fruit. Fruit smoothies. Hues of pinks and purples—not green.
This felt like cheating on my smoothie. 
But I read the benefits of a green smoothie, and I was pretty much (unfortunately) convinced that I had to try it at least once.
So I picked a “good one.”
Homemade grits makes a smoothie that she said was actually delicious. So hey, I figured, why not?
The smoothie I made consists of 
One bunch of kale (that’s like 5 or 6 stems of it—the whole thing)
One green apple
1/2 tablespoon of raw honey (It’s gotta be raw)
One banana 
1/3 cup of water
A little slice of ginger (I don’t know…just little, sorry)
Some ice (oh, it hurt so bad)
So, as much as it pained me, the first thing I threw into the Ninja (favorite blender of all time, by the way) was 5 stems of kale and the water. I had to break it down a lot because it wouldn’t fit too well. Then I slowly added in a frozen banana (the recipe didn’t call for frozen, but I just couldn’t bear to put in that much ice). Next came a quartered (but entire) green apple—maybe the fruit would overpower the kale, I thought. 
Then came about 1/2 tbsp of raw honey. Luckily I already have raw honey because it’s good for my crappy skin, too, but you can find this in any health food store or quite possibly your regular grocery store if they carry organic products. It just must be raw. I cannot even begin to explain to you the massive benefits of raw honey—but let’s just say it can be used to treat sepsis and third degree burns. No joke.
Finally a bit of ginger, and a bit of ice because I didn’t have enough frozen ingredients to make it a smoothie. 
It’s not that the taste is terrible. It’s not. But it’s not delicious either, and I’d be lying to you if I said otherwise. But let me just throw the health benefits of this out there so you understand why someone might drink one of these bad boys:
Water: Duh.Kale: Like I said yesterday, absurd amounts of beta-carotenes and other cancer-fighting nutrients, and it’s anti-inflammatory and great for cardiovascular support—and excellent for detoxification.Banana: ridiculous amounts of potassium and vitamin A, great for energy and support, a good source of fiber, relief of menstrual pain, bananas can even help lift the spirits of people suffering with depression and help cure hangovers and prevent nicotine withdrawal .Granny Smith Apple: great source of fiber and good for cardiovascular support and the skin—these apples are also lower on the glycemic index than their fellow apples Raw honey: like I said, antibacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-viralGinger: cancer-fighting, relieves nausea, heart burn, migraines, and menstrual cramps, great for pregnant women with morning sickness
So yeah, anyway, it’s the slight leafy texture that gets me. I doubt this will make an appearance again on my meal list, but I’m glad I tried it. It’s definitely a good way to kick off my week of renewing my health, even if it isn’t a great tasting way. Certainly could be worse.

First full day of fruit and vegetable eating.

The Green Smoothie.

Now, listen. I am a champion of smoothie-making. It really is something I nearly pride myself on. Planet Smoothie and Smoothie King have nothing on me—that’s legitimate. I make a mean fruit smoothie, and a big reason why is because I use all frozen fruit and no ice. Ice in smoothies just isn’t tasty. I don’t like that texture. My smoothies really are smooth, and they’re thicker and way more delicious that way. 

So anyway, smoothies have always been a big thing for me. 

But they’re fruit. Fruit smoothies. Hues of pinks and purples—not green.

This felt like cheating on my smoothie. 

But I read the benefits of a green smoothie, and I was pretty much (unfortunately) convinced that I had to try it at least once.

So I picked a “good one.”

Homemade grits makes a smoothie that she said was actually delicious. So hey, I figured, why not?

The smoothie I made consists of 

  • One bunch of kale (that’s like 5 or 6 stems of it—the whole thing)
  • One green apple
  • 1/2 tablespoon of raw honey (It’s gotta be raw)
  • One banana 
  • 1/3 cup of water
  • A little slice of ginger (I don’t know…just little, sorry)
  • Some ice (oh, it hurt so bad)

So, as much as it pained me, the first thing I threw into the Ninja (favorite blender of all time, by the way) was 5 stems of kale and the water. I had to break it down a lot because it wouldn’t fit too well. Then I slowly added in a frozen banana (the recipe didn’t call for frozen, but I just couldn’t bear to put in that much ice). Next came a quartered (but entire) green apple—maybe the fruit would overpower the kale, I thought. 

Then came about 1/2 tbsp of raw honey. Luckily I already have raw honey because it’s good for my crappy skin, too, but you can find this in any health food store or quite possibly your regular grocery store if they carry organic products. It just must be raw. I cannot even begin to explain to you the massive benefits of raw honey—but let’s just say it can be used to treat sepsis and third degree burns. No joke.

Finally a bit of ginger, and a bit of ice because I didn’t have enough frozen ingredients to make it a smoothie. 

It’s not that the taste is terrible. It’s not. But it’s not delicious either, and I’d be lying to you if I said otherwise. But let me just throw the health benefits of this out there so you understand why someone might drink one of these bad boys:

Water: Duh.
Kale: Like I said yesterday, absurd amounts of beta-carotenes and other cancer-fighting nutrients, and it’s anti-inflammatory and great for cardiovascular support—and excellent for detoxification.
Banana:
 ridiculous amounts of potassium and vitamin A, great for energy and support, a good source of fiber, relief of menstrual pain, bananas can even help lift the spirits of people suffering with depression and help cure hangovers and prevent nicotine withdrawal .
Granny Smith Apple: great source of fiber and good for cardiovascular support and the skin—these apples are also lower on the glycemic index than their fellow apples 
Raw honey: like I said, antibacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-viral
Ginger: cancer-fighting, relieves nausea, heart burn, migraines, and menstrual cramps, great for pregnant women with morning sickness

So yeah, anyway, it’s the slight leafy texture that gets me. I doubt this will make an appearance again on my meal list, but I’m glad I tried it. It’s definitely a good way to kick off my week of renewing my health, even if it isn’t a great tasting way. Certainly could be worse.

And so it begins. 
These, ladies and gentlemen, are baked kale chips. 
This is my first experience with kale. 
I’m generally not overly adventurous with my vegetables. 
My diet is generally pretty lacking in “green.” I stick to green peas, green beans, green peppers, and the occasional spinach or arugula salad. But yeah, green is rare. So a week of fruits and vegetables meant it was time to experiment. 
Enter kale. 
Wikipedia taught me yesterday that kale is extremely high in beta carotene, vitamin K, vitamin C, carotenoids, and calcium. It prevents cancer like a boss and boosts DNA repair.
So basically, perfect detox food.
But it highly resembles a garnish, and I am not yet resigning to just munching on it raw. So when my detox partner/one of my best friends and I found kale chips, it was an automatic first choice to kick off our week of healthy eating. 
Admittedly, when I began cutting it, I did not like the smell. It’s not overpowering, but it certainly isn’t delightful, either. But reading about the benefits of kale again was enough to remind me that a faint smell was a small price to pay for the apparent king of detox foods. Plus, it’s no where near as terrible as mushrooms. 
Anyway, these are ridiculously simple. All you have to do is cut the leafy part off of the stem, tear it into bite-sized pieces, drizzle those pieces in olive oil and bake for 10-15 minutes at 350F (line your baking pan with parchment paper, too). Really couldn’t be easier. 
I won’t lie, the final product is weird looking. And weird feeling. But of course, taste is the most important part—and the taste was actually pretty good! They almost tasted salty, despite the fact that I used absolutely no salt. And they were light and crispy. I won’t pretend they’re “just like Lays” or anything, but they’re pretty darn good and absurdly good for you, too. 
Kale chips are a winner.

And so it begins. 

These, ladies and gentlemen, are baked kale chips. 

This is my first experience with kale. 

I’m generally not overly adventurous with my vegetables. 

My diet is generally pretty lacking in “green.” I stick to green peas, green beans, green peppers, and the occasional spinach or arugula salad. But yeah, green is rare. So a week of fruits and vegetables meant it was time to experiment. 

Enter kale. 

Wikipedia taught me yesterday that kale is extremely high in beta carotene, vitamin K, vitamin C, carotenoids, and calcium. It prevents cancer like a boss and boosts DNA repair.

So basically, perfect detox food.

But it highly resembles a garnish, and I am not yet resigning to just munching on it raw. So when my detox partner/one of my best friends and I found kale chips, it was an automatic first choice to kick off our week of healthy eating. 

Admittedly, when I began cutting it, I did not like the smell. It’s not overpowering, but it certainly isn’t delightful, either. But reading about the benefits of kale again was enough to remind me that a faint smell was a small price to pay for the apparent king of detox foods. Plus, it’s no where near as terrible as mushrooms. 

Anyway, these are ridiculously simple. All you have to do is cut the leafy part off of the stem, tear it into bite-sized pieces, drizzle those pieces in olive oil and bake for 10-15 minutes at 350F (line your baking pan with parchment paper, too). Really couldn’t be easier. 

I won’t lie, the final product is weird looking. And weird feeling. But of course, taste is the most important part—and the taste was actually pretty good! They almost tasted salty, despite the fact that I used absolutely no salt. And they were light and crispy. I won’t pretend they’re “just like Lays” or anything, but they’re pretty darn good and absurdly good for you, too. 

Kale chips are a winner.

However, Monday through Friday of this week I’m doing an all fruits/vegetables/nuts “detox” of sorts (no bread?! crying already), so I’m going to be getting really creative because vegetables are one of my least favorite food groups. Although I do love peas. And I mean LOVE them—as in my parents got me a 12-can pack of Le Sueur Peas for Christmas.

Anyway, it’s not the usual sugar-filled deliciousness I usually post, but if you’re interested in eating healthy, stay tuned :)

Whole Wheat BBQ Shrimp Flatbread
I know it’s been forever since I’ve updated this. But I made this for dinner tonight and it was delicious.

Whole Wheat BBQ Shrimp Flatbread

I know it’s been forever since I’ve updated this. But I made this for dinner tonight and it was delicious.